By Kerry Grens, Reuters

Babies who ate more fruits and vegetables and fewer packaged foods were less likely to develop food allergies in a new study that looked at overall diet patterns instead of just specific foods.

“We have been aware that certain diets seem to reduce the risk of allergy in infants,” said Dr. Magnus Wickman, a professor at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, who was not involved in the study.

“The mechanism behind that is that we think that different kinds of fatty acids and antioxidants, different kinds of vitamins and essential minerals are good for your health and also prevent allergy,” he said.

Researchers estimate that up to eight percent of children have a food allergy.

Parents are sometimes advised to avoid certain foods as a means of preventing food allergies from starting. But Kate Grimshaw, lead author of the new study and a researcher at the University of Southampton in the UK, said she’s been concerned that parents are reducing the nutritional diversity of their infants’ diet without there being a great deal of evidence to back it up.

To see how parents are feeding their infants, and whether that appears to have any influence on food allergies, Grimshaw and her colleagues collected food diaries from the parents of 1,140 babies.

The parents typically maintained the diet log for the first year of life, Grimshaw and her colleagues report in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

During that time, 41 children were diagnosed with a food allergy, and Grimshaw’s group compared these infants to 82 similar babies without an allergy.

The researchers scored the babies’ diets based on the combination of different foods they ate.

They found that babies without food allergies scored higher than babies with allergies on a diet that was rich in healthy, often homemade, foods – including fruits, vegetables, poultry and fish – and scant on processed foods such as pre-made meals, potato chips, cook-in sauces and bacon.

“The analysis showed that the infants who were having more fruits and vegetables and less commercially produced baby foods and also less adult foods were the ones who were less likely to develop an allergy by the time they were two,” Grimshaw said.

You can read the rest of this article at Reuters.

This Post Has One Comment

  1. This article is confusing. So is the debate between feeding your baby fruits and veggies (versus…chips and bacon, seriously?) or between MAKING these things fresh versus purchasing them in a packaged form? I’m not sure the author is sure what they are writing about. Also, she mentions pre-packaged meals but not specifically pre-packaged veggie foods. There are wonderful organic baby foods on the market today. Will these cause my baby to have higher allergy levels than if I mashed up organic spinach and sweet potato myself? I am sure some nutrients are compromised but enough to link allergies? Just curious. I was actually interested in reading the article unfortunately it wasn’t very helpful.

Comments are closed.

Close Menu
×

Cart